How to make printer default in terminal server ( TS ) / remote desktop server ( RDS )

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If you are wanting to use your printer on a Terminal Server (TS) or Remote Desktop Server (RDS), ensure you have allowed your connection to redirect your printers or they will not been seen on the remote server.

To set your remote session default printer, please ensure that if you want a local printer to be the default printer on the server, it must be set to the DEFAULT printer on your computer.

To select a default printer

  1. Open Devices and Printers by clicking the Start button Picture of the Start button, and then, on the Start menu, clicking Devices and Printers.

  2. Right-click the printer you want to use, and then click Set as default printer. (You’ll see a check mark on the printer’s icon signifying that it’s now your default printer.)

If you are running a Thin Client device, you will need to either have a VPN setup or the printer needs to have its port and IP address open to the internet.
Setting default printers on Thin clients, (unless there is an OS or is capable of seeing the local printer in its OS), is a little more complex and not discussed here.

If you still need assistance, please contact Sterling IT via our contact form or call our office.

Video on how to create a new profile and setup Office 365 Exchange email account with Outlook 2013 or 2016 profile

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1. Create an Outlook profile

This is NOT required if adding a second account – skip to point 2

A profile consists of accounts, data files, and settings that specify where your email messages are saved.

  1. Exit Outlook.
  2. In Control Panel, click or double-click Mail.Where is Mail in Control Panel?

    Mail appears in different Control Panel locations depending on the version of the Microsoft Windows operating system, Control Panel view selected, and whether a 32- or 64-bit operating system or version of Microsoft Outlook is installed.

    The easiest way to locate Mail is to open Control Panel in Windows, and then in the Search box at the top of window, type Mail. In Control Panel for Windows XP, type Mail in the Address box.

    Note:  The Mail icon appears after Outlook starts for the first time.

    The title bar of the Mail Setup dialog box contains the name of the current profile. To select a different existing profile, click Show Profiles, select the profile name, and then click Properties.

  3. Click Show Profiles.
  4. Click Add.
  5. Type a name for the profile, and then click OK.

2. Add an email account in Outlook for Windows

In Outlook 2013 or Outlook 2016 for Windows, you can add Exchange and Office 365 email accounts, as well as IMAP or POP accounts like Outlook.com (Outlook on the web), AOL, Gmail, MobileMe, Yahoo! Mail, and more.

What do you want to do?

  • (2a)Set up my first email account
  • (2b)Set up an additional email account

2(a)Set up my first email account

To add an email account to Outlook 2013 or Outlook 2016 for Windows for the first time, the Auto Account Setup starts automatically when you first run the app.

  1. Start Outlook for the first time.
  2. From the Welcome screen, click Next.
  3. To add an email account, click Yes, and then click Next.
  4. Enter your name, email address, and password, and then click Next.Note: If your computer is connected to a domain for an organization that uses Microsoft Exchange Server, your email information is automatically inserted and the password box doesn’t appear because your Exchange account uses the same password as the one you use to log on to your computer.
  5. Click Finish.

2(b)Set up an additional email account

  1. Click the File tab, and in the right pane, click Add Account.Add and email account
  2. In the Add Account box, with Email Account selected, enter your name, email address, password, retype your password, and click Next.Tip: Outlook will complete the set-up for your account.
  3. Do one of the following:
    • Click Finish to close the Add Account box.
    • Click Add another account, and follow steps 1 – 3 of this procedure.

Note:  Sometimes Outlook 2013 can’t automatically set up a new account and might ask you to try again using an unencrypted connection to the mail server. If that doesn’t work, you can still add the account manually. Contact your email administrator or provider or for help with any settings you’re unsure of.

Received an email? Do you click or not click? – Malware, Scams, Trojans, Viruses could be lurking

The internet has become an indispensable tool for everyday life, both personal and business. Its global use and familiarity has also opened the doors for cyber-criminals to take every opportunity to exploit vulnerable people through disturbing online attacks. Online scams and malware are also becoming increasingly sophisticated, and while IT professionals are aware of what to look for and how to fix problems when they arise, their colleagues may be confused by the latest scams discussed in the media.

Botnets

A botnet is the result of a criminal using malware (malicious software) to turn a computer into a bot, short for robot. In conjunction with a large number of other computers, these systems together form a botnet. Bots can often propagate themselves across the Internet by searching for vulnerable and unprotected computers. Exposed computers can be infected quickly and unknown to the user stay dormant until they are required to perform their detrimental attack. Once infected these bots can be controlled remotely to perform automated tasks over the internet such as sending out spam, malware and spyware; launching denial of service (DoS) attacks against other systems; or participating in other types of cyber-crime such as theft or fraud.

Hacking

Computer hacking has been around much longer then people have had PCs in their own homes, and is the term used to describe gaining unauthorised access into a computer. Hacking can be used to find weaknesses in your security settings which are then exploited to gain sensitive or personal information, to install malware, or to block or hijack your access to websites or email.

Malware

Extremely common, malware, or malicious software, is software you don’t want to infect your computer. Malware includes computer viruses, worms, ransomware and Trojan horses. Specifically designed to disrupt, damage or gain control of a computer system or data, therein each of these types of malware has its own purpose. Malware does a range of things, it may tell you that your computer has a security problem, re-formats your hard drive, alters, deletes or encrypts files; steals sensitive information, sends unauthorised emails, or takes control of your computer and all of the software on it.

Types of Malware

Viruses

A computer virus when executed will replicate by inserting copies of itself (possibly modified) into your computer programs, data files, the hard drive or connected network shares. By doing this the virus infects your system and interferes with the way a computer operates. Viruses are often spread via normal looking attachments in an email message or instant message; through downloads, or in pirated software.

Trojan Horse

Like the Greek tale, the Trojan horse or Trojan, employs social engineering so that it looks legitimate, useful or interesting to the potential victim who is then more susceptible to installing it on their computer. As a non-self-replicating type of malware program it is designed so when it is executed it carries out the actions determined in the program, often including joining the computer to a botnet.

Ransomware

As a relatively recent addition to the malware family, ransomware is a digital form of extortion. When you open a malicious email attachment or click a malicious link in an email message, instant message, on a social networking site, or other website; ransomware is downloaded onto your computer and is designed to block access to all your files and programs until a sum of money is paid. A computer becomes basically inoperable as you have no access to any of your files (unless you have done regular data backups). It is generally advised that you don’t pay the ransom as you cannot be guaranteed you will get the key or code to unlock your files.

Phishing

Phishing has also become a firm favourite of cyber-criminals. These sophisticated modern day forgers use deception and social engineering techniques to trick users. This is done by sending emails, text messages or website links purporting to be from authentic companies that the victim may have had previous communications with (also called spoofing). These fake messages or links are then used to persuade the recipient to reveal personal information including usernames, passwords and credit card details. Phishing scams have become increasingly prevalent because they are easy to execute, and with little effort.

Spam

Spam is another common method for sending information out and collecting it from unsuspecting people. Spam is usually the mass distribution of unsolicited messages, marketing, advertising or pornography. Spam tends to annoy people mostly by clogging their inboxes with junk, however it can also be a vehicle for malware, scams, fraud and threats to privacy.

TIPS FOR CYBER SECURITY

It is vital that anyone who sends and receives emails daily (at home or at work) is made aware and well educated on these common types of cyber threats.
There are a wide range of things you should remember or put into place within your organisation, to ensure your computer/computers are protected the best way possible.

• Avoid giving your email address out online. If you publish your email address on the web, make it unscannable so that it cannot be harvested by bots. There are alternative ways to display an email address which in turn makes it hard for spambots and cyber criminals to harvest it.

• Never open an attachment that is a .zip file or .exe file unless you are expecting it. Files from unknown senders often contain some kind of malware or virus.

• Check who is sending you email communication. Be aware that malware, phishing scams or spam may come from unrecognisable or odd email addresses, however legitimate email addresses can be forged easily.

• Never respond. If unsure, report the message as ‘spam’ to your service provider, and delete it! Also, you should delete the email from your trash to save you accidentally opening it in the future.

• Only click links from trusted senders. If an email has a link you don’t recognise, take a closer look by hovering your mouse over and checking the destination in your browser. If it doesn’t match, it is not legitimate.

• Check for spelling, grammar and syntax. Most malware, phishing scams or spam originate from foreign countries so may contain some very obvious errors.

• A reputable company or organisation will never use an email to request personal information. If you think there is a possibility it may be legitimate, type the real URL into your browser or contact the company directly.

• Reading an email in plain text rather than html can help to avoid phishing attempts, however this is not 100% foolproof.

• Report any suspicious or scam emails to the company that is being imitated, your email security provider, or to SCAMwatch.

• If a computer runs slowly, keeps crashing or stops responding often, this could be a sign that the computer is infected. Get an IT professional to take a look for you.

• It is extremely important to back up your data every single day.

• Utilise multilayered defences. This includes installing anti-virus, anti-malware, anti-spyware, and using cloud based email filtering and web filtering services. You should also not conduct day to day work with Administrator privileges on your workstation. Instead, you should use elevated privileges only when required, for example to install trusted software. Having one form of protection alone may not cover you for all the possible threats.

• Keep your software regularly updated. Software that updates automatically is incredibly beneficial to busy organisations.

• Use strong passwords and keep them secret. It is also a good idea to change them on a regular basis. Don’t use the same password for multiple accounts.

• Install a firewall on your computer and never turn it off.

• Increase security settings on your browser. You can limit user rights to certain online sites.

• Use external devices cautiously. This includes USBs and iPads/iPhones etc. as these can become infected with malware, corrupting your computer.

Cyber criminals are quite adept at tricking email users into falling for their scams. They are always coming up with new methods of deception. It is in the best interest of every company to ensure all their employees are educated on the most commonly known threats. Staying cyber-vigilant and applying solid security measures, is always the best defence against any future breaches.

Want to add another of level of protection on your email? Filter with Mailguard – the providers of the information above.

Need more information, quote on Mailguard or training for your staff?
Contact Us NOW! – Don’t Delay

How to fix problem Mazda 3 / 6 / CX7 / CX9 and more with handsfree bluetooth and Apple phones iOS 8 problems not calling

Edited 14.3.2015

Finally Apple updated the IOS 8.2 and bluetooth is now working in Mazda Vehicles. If you have another brand tested, please leave in comments. Thank you 

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If you are the owner of a Mazda and an Apple iPhone, good change you will have issues trying to call with your iPhone and it connecting to the bluetooth. There is a way around this by selecting speaker and when person picks up, select on the phone the bluetooth. DANGEROUS!

Hands-free are suppose to be SAFE and Mazda/Apple have not worked together to keep this safe.

There are hundreds of forums discussing this but it seems that the problem is iOS8 as even with an iPhone 5 with iOS7 there is no issues but as soon as that phone or other phones are upgraded to iOS 8 the problem starts.

After months of frustration and reading forums, we have found the solution (or the answer) on the Mazda website.

Mazda’s response is as follows:

These devices have been tested in accordance with Mazda interoperability standards. Overall device compatibility as well as individual feature operation and functionality is contingent upon the device software version, device operating system, device settings, wireless service provider, and third party applications installed on the device. Individual user results may vary. Mazda Australia and Visteon Corporation are not responsible for software irregularities or hardware issues devices may experience that are outside of our testing scope. As new device software versions become available, test compatibility results may change so please check these results regularly. Last update occurred on 17/12/2014.

Click the link and it will take you to Mazda showing compatibility.

http://www.mazdahandsfree.com/howto-findaphone?language=en-AU

Beware Apple iOS attacks using ‘Masque Attack’ techniques from uncertified apps

Researchers have discovered a technique that may enable attackers to substitute malware for a legitimate app on Apple iOS devices such as iPhones and iPads.

Although the risk of being subjected to a Masque Attack is low, it is another reminder not to download pirated apps or software from untrusted sources. It is also a reminder that Apple products are increasingly being targeted by attackers.

As many people believe you cannot get a virus/trojans/malware on Apple devices (more so on OSX), this is not true and Apple devices, due to their numbers, will and currently are being targeted. Sterling IT use and recommend Webroot and/or Trend Micro Antivirus to protect Apple Mac.

About Masque Attack

A Masque Attack can occur if a user downloads an app from a rogue source such as a link embedded in a phishing email or from an unofficial app site hosting fake ‘uncertified’ apps.

The Masque Attack takes advantage of a weakness in iOS security which can enable malware to be installed.

If a malicious app can be crafted to use the same ‘bundle identifier’ (an ID Apple uses to identify individual apps) as a legitimate app on your phone, Apple will not check its security certificate. It means that a malicious app can replace a legitimate app on your device.

A criminal using the Masque Attack technique will typically disguise their malware as a popular game or program for you to install. Only install via the APP STORE via your device.

Once installed it may be able to steal information from your device such as passwords or internet banking details and send them to a remote server controlled by criminals. Possible impacts include the malware being able to steal logon credentials; access sensitive data; avoid detection and steal Apple IDs and passwords.

Staying safe

  1. Do not download software or apps from untrusted sources. Sticking with Apple’s AppStore helps protect against downloading malicious software
  2. Do not click ‘install’ from pop ups when viewing a web page. Even if it tells you , that you have a virus. Most of these are traps.
    Sterling IT has posted MANY emails recently with relation to this and unfortunately we are still getting clients infected, even with prior warning.
  3. If your iOS device shows an ‘Untrusted App Developer’ alert when you open an app, click on ‘Don’t Trust’ and uninstall the app immediately.
  4. Use security software for all your computer and mobile devices.
  5. Keep your system up-to-date by downloading software updates as they are released.
  6. Do not connect or ‘pair’ your device with untrusted computers.

For FREE advice or any questions regards to this, please contact Sterling IT. You are better asking as prevention is better than cure!!